Site 13: Storm Water


Adjacent housing and its associated discharge of storm water can pose challenges for the protection of wetland habitats.

Tumara Park is taking advantage of the ability of wetlands to purify water and retain contaminants. Across the road, a system of swales and ponds collect storm water from the development for removal of up to 90% of likely contaminants and sediment. Most of this treated water is

absorbed into the ground.

Storm Water Swale

Storm Water Swale

Weirs and sediment traps filter any surplus water before it eventually drains into Travis Wetland via this swale. Some nutrients do leak into the edge of the wetland, as revealed by the bright green of the grass.

Bracken fern here on the dune replaced coastal bush destroyed by fire. At the time of Maori settlement, susceptible vegetation throughout the eastern South Island succumbed to the frequent burning. These fires are known in Maori tradition as the Fires of Tamatea.

Enjoy the vista of the Port Hills. Their volcanic origin is a stark contrast to the low lying coastal swamp.

Can you find this plant ?

Can you see this bird ?

Pukeko, Porphyrio porphyrio

One of New Zealands most recognisable native birds the Pukeko is equally at home in open pasture and parks as it is in the wetland environment that was it’s original habitat.
Pukeko form “family” groups with multiple male and female birds often sharing a nest and responsibility for incubation of eggs and the guarding and feeding of chicks.
Travis Wetland is an important place for Pukeko supporting over half of the Christchurch population and is the largest Canterbury winter colony of birds, around 700.

Pukeko

Pukeko

Pukeko

Pukeko