Site 3: Millennium Forest


Recreating the original vegetation types is the one of the main restoration tasks. Although the area around you appears natural, most of these native trees, shrubs, and tussocks were planted.

Known as the Millennium Forest, this area was first planted in 2000. Tall tussock sedges and rushes bordering the pond are already starting to seed and spread naturally. The plantings of young trees and shrubs grade from the wet-margin species near the water to species characteristic of drier sites near them main path.

Seedlings of future forest giants are planted here. See if you can spot: Totara, Kahikatea, Matai.

Millennium Forest

Millennium Forest

Compare the leaves of these native conifers with the softer broader leaves of the other plants growing here.

Nectar bearing flowers like those of the kowhai and NZ flax or harakeke will attract native bellbirds.

As the carefully planned mosaic of plantings and waterways becomes more established, the swamp will provide shelter and food for increasing numbers and types of native bush and wetland birds.

Millennium Forest

Millennium Forest

Travis Wetland is a vital link in a network of green spaces and waterways that support bird life in Christchurch. It is the largest freshwater swamp on the flyway used by birds travelling between the Avon-Heathcote Estuary, the Avon River, the Waimakariri River, and the high country beyond.

Most of the wetland birds you see here live elsewhere at some stage during their lives. Visiting winter flocks have already increased substantially.

Travis Wetland is the last large area of diverse wetland habitat left in the city suitable for pukeko. About half of Christchurch’s pukeko live here in winter – up to 700 birds, one of the largest concentrations in New Zealand. Many of them breed here. In early summer, watch out for pukeko mothers with their chicks on the next section of the walk. Make time to linger at the bird hide for some great bird spotting. Watch out for interesting bird visitors – Travis Wetland attracts them!

Can you find this plant ?

Totara, Podocarpus totara

Totara is a species of podocarp tree endemic to New Zealand.

The Totara is a medium to large tree which grows slowly to around 20 to 25 m.

Totara

Totara

Totara

Totara

Totara

Totara

Can you see this bird ?

Grey Warbler, Gerygone igata, Riroriro

This grey brown bird is the smallest bird you will see at Travis Wetland.

It can be seen constantly flitting through the canopy in search of spiders and insects and their larvae.

It may be diminutive in size but it has one of the loudest and most melodic calls of any of the New Zealand bush birds.

Grey Warbler

Grey Warbler